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Table 1 Sociodemographic characteristics of the IDI study participants (n = 58)

From: Institutional-level drivers of gender-inequitable scientific career progression in sub-Saharan Africa

Gender Other characteristics Total (n = 58) MSc (n = 14) PhD (n = 19) PDF (n = 18) MCR (n = 7)
Women (n = 32)
 Age range 25–29 9 7 2
30–34 12 2 9 1
35–39 5 2 3
40–44 4 1 2 1
45–49 2 1 1
Total 32 9 12 6 5
 Marital status Unmarrieda 16 7 4 3 2
Married 16 2 8 3 3
Total 32 9 12 6 5
 With children < 5 years Unmarried (16) 4/16 0/7 0/4 2/3 2/2
Married (16) 12/16 2/2 6/8 3/3 1/3
Total (32) 16/32 2/9 6/12 5/6 3/5
 Family educational backgroundb Highly educated 8 2 2 1 3
Less educated 24 7 10 5 2
Total 32 9 12 6 5
Men (n = 26)
 Age range 25–29 4 3 1
30–34 8 2 3 3
35–39 9 3 5 1
40–44 2 2
45–49 3 2 1
Total 26 5 7 12 2
 Marital status Unmarrieda 11 5 4 1 1
Married 15 3 11 1
Total 26 5 7 12 2
 With children < 5 years Unmarried (11) 0/11 0/5 0/4 0/1 0/1
Married (15) 11/15 0 1/3 10/11 0/1
Total (26) 11/26 0/5 1/7 10/12 0/2
 Family educational backgroundb Highly educated 4 1 1 2 0
Less educated 22 4 6 10 2
Total 26 5 7 12 2
  1. aThe label “unmarried” includes those who identified themselves as single (never married), divorced, or separated. We grouped them together in order to protect participants’ anonymity and confidentiality, particularly for the latter two identities
  2. bWe based this on the parents’ and siblings’ level of education, with those who had attended university considered as highly educated